Here is our weekly infographic.  I am always curious how teenagers are communicate in a digital world.  Teenagers are adapting quickly to new forms of communication.  This is one reason why it is so important for youth workers to stay relevant, and current on what they use, and how they communicate to teenagers.

Here are a few things that stand out to me from this infographic called: How American Teens Communicate.  

1. 93% of teens use a phone.  I am starting to understand hot crucial it is to develop a texting strategy for your youth ministry.  I use to think that facebook and twitter was crucial, but I am now realizing how effective and important it is to have a strategy to mass text your youth ministry.

2. Email is still king.  This is still a shocker to me.  I didn’t think anyone used email any more.  Especially not 93% of teenagers.  Again it is important to have a strategy for developing a mailing list.  I recommend using mailchimp.  You can read about that from my free ebook called, 5 Ways to Communicate Effectively in a Digital World.

 

What else stands out to you from this infographic on how teenagers communicate?  Leave a comment below. 

how teens communicate

  • Nick Arnold

    I admit the email statistic is surprising for me as well.

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  • John Lunsford

    Is there information available on where the polling took place for this info graphic? I’m not sure that I agree with most of it because for our community, it’s just not true.
    I have paid for a mailchimp account in the past and watched the analytics to see how many were opened, forwarded, bounced, etc. Our students didn’t read the email. If something was announced or detailed in the email, our kids missed it because they don’t check their email. Subsequently, we stopped the email service. We now mass text through the SYM service and send the text to our Facebook and Twitter pages as well.
    With that said however, Facebook is heading the way of MySpace for the students in our community. We’re talking more than 3K high school students. Of the 1K+ 7th and 8th graders, they don’t even access Facebook anymore. Email isn’t even a thought for most of them unless it’s necessary to set up a new social media account.
    Twitter however is blowing up. Everyone has a twitter account and uses it 20+ times a day. Even Instagram is beginning the slow death.
    I’m curious to know if our community is the odd one in the bunch or settling in with the rest of the country.
    We’re in north Phoenix by the way.

    • Thanks John for the comment. I agree with you. Email isn’t the only way, but it is one way. The infographic says that 90% of students use it, but they might never open your email because they think it’s spam. I personally think that texting is the way to go for any youth ministry.

      Love your insights into what is working for your youth ministry. How do you use twitter to interact with students?

      • John Lunsford

        Well, first of all, I ask that all our leaders have a twitter account and follow all the students that they interact with through any ministry context.
        Second, because we use the SYM tool, it connects to our ministry twitter account and sends all updates through text as well as Twitter.
        We did a series last month called Trending. I purchased the materials for that through DYM. It specifically asked students to tweet during the service #trendinghsm. It was a huge reaction from the community students NOT attending. Haters and supporters both started following just to see what was going on.

        Most importantly though, it allows us to see our kids in action. Most students display unfiltered emotion on social media. If our leaders are paying attention (to attention seeking kids, no less) then we have the opportunity to minister in a much better way.

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  • BOOM! Share the knowledge. Great stats, thank you!

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